Confessions of a Florentine Pet Sitter


Expressions West 2015, Coos Art Museum
orbetellodalmatian_jolley_blog

Orbetello Dalmatian by Win Jolley

I am tooting my horn today for the acceptance of my painting into a biennial exhibit at the Coos Bay Art Museum called Expressions West 2015. It’s a fairly big show on the central Oregon coast. This is the first time my work has been accepted since I’ve been in Oregon. And I think it’s all because I served my painting of the bridge structure upside down!

One other local artist, Win Jolley, also got his work accepted. Needless to say, we are both pretty pleased. An elite crowd of two! I am including my image called “Up-Ended” (below) and Win’s image, called “Orbetello Dalmatian” (above) in this blog.

The two are far apart in subject and style and colors, which may be indicative of the juror’s flavor for the show. Win’s is a realistic watercolor rendition of a beautiful Dalmatian dog set in an Italian village, maybe Orbetello? It is crisp, clear, warm colors and superbly designed with excellent draftsmanship.  The color and collage of the repetitive motif on the left, the spots on the dog, and the geometric patterns of bricks together provide a unity of textures and colors.

UpEnded_susancanavarro_blog

Up-Ended by Susan Canavarro

My painting of the local Siuslaw River Bridge structure is abstract based on a flipped version of reality.  The  dark values and rusty colors of the structure set off the blues of nature’s sky; the sky with its soft morning light near the horizon and it’s cool cobalt at its zenith, in turn, acts as a foil or backdrop for the human-made structure. But I was looking for something more abstract, something that didn’t say “bridge,” but said Hey what? It becomes a simple relationship between positive/negative shapes, between natural and human-made, and between what’s up and what’s down. Doing one tiny thing like turning a painting upside down can change it from being a realistic rendition to an abstract design.

The official Press Release is below:

Two local Florence artists, Win Jolley and SusanCanavarro, have had their work juried into the Expressions West 2015 painting competition at the Coos Art Museum. Win’s watercolor “Orbetello Dalmatian” and Susan’s acrylic painting “Up-Ended” were two of sixty-one paintings selected.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception for Expressions West 2015  on April 24 from 5 to 7 pm. Many participating artists will be in attendance. An awards ceremony begins at 6 PM and Juror Brian Hoover will present the prize awards for the competition.​

The Expressions West 2015 painting exhibit runs from April 24 to June 27, 2015. Artists from thirteen western states were invited to compete in this biennial event. Juror Brian Hoover selected sixty-one paintings by forty-four artists residing in California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, New Mexico, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.



The Defiant One
The Defiant One

The Defiant One

One day as I sat on the sofa and Blondie, in rare form, had just jumped up on the sofa with me to sniff my clean laundry, I must have made a noise that startled her or moved my big toe or something, for suddenly she somersaulted backwards off the sofa landing on all four paws. She turned her head to look at me, a surprised look in her eyes tinted with a bit of embarrassment. Humans also tend to look to see what caused our tripping. Usually just a bump in the sidewalk or a root in the ground, or even sometimes a cat. But the looking is a sign of one’s disbelief that one just tripped…Did I just do that?  And  also to see if anyone, God forbid, noticed our clumsiness.  Blondie was checking to see if I had seen what happened to her when she somersaulted off the sofa. Yes I saw you, Blondie. Her alert four-paw stance said she was ready to run if she sensed danger. At the same moment her look was one of bewilderment, as if she was thinking, What the hell just happened here anyway?

Blondie is an agile cat. She jumps as high as six feet to a high window ledge, she leaps five feet over a three-foot high sofa, while at the same time, squeezes her body into very tight spaces. But most of the time, she can jump up to a high shelf with decorative pots and small sculptures and wander the length of it without destroying one item. But then again most cats are nimble and careful enough to wind their way through a forest of precious objects, including expensive art objects.

When it gets tricky is when a cat is acting in defiance and knocking items off shelves on purpose, and I mean knowingly batting things off shelves with her paws. When the people are away the cats will play they say. When a substitute teacher comes to class, the students act-up. I remember doing everything our little brains could think of to make our substitute teacher’s day harder and more unpleasant, like chewing loudly on carrots in the back row, tapping our pencils against our desks, gossiping with friends and uncontrolled giggling. From my experience as a teacher for a college art class, I know how annoying that extraneous talking is. Blondie acts up when I am with her, doing things she never does with her owner. She knocks things off shelves, chews on artificial plants, breaks into the liquor cabinet, sharpens her claws on furniture she’s not supposed to scratch on. And I am reluctant to punish her for fear of alienating her for life.

Whenever I am there now she has taken to knocking off two tiny Bengal cat figurines from a shelf in the guest bath. The figurines, made of something similar to ceramic but more durable, hit the tile floor with a loud crash. They never break into tiny pieces, even their thin tiny tails and paws and ears do not crack or break. Blondie knows the guest bath is mine while I’m there. She knows I am the only one to use it. She knows I sleep in the guest bedroom right next to this bathroom. She knows the tiny cats make a loud noise when they hit the floor or when they land in the waste basket. Score one for Blondie, she meows. When I get up to see what happened she stares at me with innocent blue eyes. Her owner says she has never knocked those pieces off the shelf before, only when I’m there. That’s cat defiance. A cat challenge? A message that says this pretty cat rules!

What is the reason behind the creature’s behavior? I believe Blondie commits  strange repetitive activities to annoy me. She knows. She also does it when she wants something from me. To get my attention. My job is to figure out what she wants! Oddly, it is an act off communication. She knocks them off at 7 am in the morning to wake me, so she is telling me it’s time for breakfast, or having kibble-nibbled already, she is telling me she wants water. She knocks them off during the day at various times because she is thirsty and she prefers to drink water out of the faucet. When I hear the clatter on the floor, I peak around the corner to find her sitting calmly on the bathroom counter, looking towards the door as if nothing happened. What, she asks? I didn’t do it!

I pick up the figurines and put them back on the shelf. Like a well-trained dog, I turn the faucet on to a slow dribble and she drinks her fill of tap water. She never bothers to turn the tap off. And I always forget it is on, until an hour later she jumps up on the table where I am busy working on my computer. She exhibits some sort of excited, animated, possibly anxious behavior. I cannot work until I discover what is causing her anxiety. My job again is to figure out what she is trying to tell me. I think maybe she wants more water, but I discover the water is still running. I forgot to turn it off. As soon as I turn it off, she settles down, shuffles off to her bed and takes a nap…finally.

I wish she could talk in my language. That would make things between us so much easier!

She knows how to open doors with levered handles, so all exterior doors have to be dead-bolted all the time. I’m thinking if she knows how to use a levered door handle she will eventually figure out how to use the levered faucet handles. She could learn to turn the water on for herself, right? Her owner says she learned how to flush a toilet a few years back. Had so much fun watching the water swirl furiously down the pipe and waiting for the bowl to fill up again, she did it over and over. She was in big trouble! I have terror-filled visions of returning from running errands in town and finding the bathroom floor awash with water because she turned the faucet on and did not turn it off. Water, water every where! If only she could teach herself to shut the water off in the same way she learns to turn it on. This hasn’t happened yet, only in my nightmares!

She is one smart defiant devilish kitty!



Bodega Bay Buildings

Bodega Buildings on the edge of Bodega Bay tidal flats. I painted this back in 1988. Recently, I found an ancient slide in my archives. Unbelievable!  Scanned it.  I wouldn’t take a magnifying glass to the image – probably covered in dirt specks from the old slide!

This is one of my favorite paintings from those days. My little sister Wendy bought it when I had a show at my step-sister Bobbie’s family gallery in Duncans Mills – a gallery started in 1988 which she still owns after all these years. Amazing that it has survived and stayed open since then, all due to Bobbi’s efforts to keep it going, arranging, hanging and hosting shows for local Sonoma County artists, throwing receptions and musical events.  She always managed to come up with new ideas each year to keep it interesting.

There is a review of that show buried in my pages on my website FlorenceArtists.com.

1988 was the year I moved to Chico to go back to college as a reentry student. Five years later I earned my BFA in painting. When I graduated I was a different person.




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